Hands poised over an old typewriter with typed page coming out.
Writing

How I wrote my book

This week's blog was supposed to be about mid-semester productivity. But I had the chance to share some exciting news via Twitter recently: The "Feminist City: A Field Guide" full manuscript has been submitted! I daydreamed the idea on a drive home from Halifax in December 2017. I didn't necessarily plan for it to go… Continue reading How I wrote my book

Old blue parking meters reading "expired" procrastination
Time management, Writing

Procrastination: Making it work for you

Many people equate procrastination (in themselves and others) with laziness or a lack of willpower. Others suggest it's born out of anxiety, perfectionism, fear of failure, and even shame. Either way, it doesn't seem like something you can just stop doing though sheer force of will. But what about all the time you're wasting by putting off your work?

Black and white photo of a man walking alone in silhouette.
Academic life

Academic hustle culture: why are we glorifying burnout and overwork?

Academic work is never really finished. Every paper could use more edits. The literature review will never be exhaustive. You can never be too prepared for class. I've found that academic work will expand to fill every hour you're willing to give it. And your institution, colleagues, supervisors, and students will be only too happy to take as much as you can give.

Academic life

Either/or thinking and the beliefs that hold us down

Academia is full of either/or beliefs. You can either be a strong researcher or a stellar teacher. You can either have work-life balance or a successful career. You can either take care of your mental health or excel in your job. You can either get a tenure track job and be happy or be stuck in non-TT, non-ac jobs and be miserable. You can either be an administrator or a faculty member. And so on.